1950 jaguar xk120 

I was fortunate enough last year to have taken on my most complicated commission yet, the restoration and repair of the wooden components on a 1950 Jaguar XK120 Roadster. The restoration was being handled by Classic Jaguar in Austin. They have fully documented the restoration progress on their website, including the entire known history of this particular chassis. You can read more about that, as well as view thousands of progress photos here.  This page will focus on the portions of the restoration that deal with the wooden components.

How it all started

This is what they started with, a complete, yet slightly worn, 1950 Jaguar XK120

This is what they started with, a complete, yet slightly worn, 1950 Jaguar XK120

Once the body components started coming off, the extent of the damage to the wooden parts became obvious.

Once the body components started coming off, the extent of the damage to the wooden parts became obvious.

This is what I was tasked with repairing. Both door frames, A-Pillar and B-Pillar parts, Door Sills, and the entire rear body and boot support structures. The goal was to restore what could be saved and replace what couldn't. 

This is what I was tasked with repairing. Both door frames, A-Pillar and B-Pillar parts, Door Sills, and the entire rear body and boot support structures. The goal was to restore what could be saved and replace what couldn't. 

The original components were all made of Ash, some solid pieces and some were laminated. My job started with prepping rough stock.

The original components were all made of Ash, some solid pieces and some were laminated. My job started with prepping rough stock.

Breaking down rough stock

Breaking down rough stock

Taking advantage of a nice January afternoon to thickness all of the lumber with my portable planer. 

Taking advantage of a nice January afternoon to thickness all of the lumber with my portable planer. 

Checking the stock for squareness

Checking the stock for squareness

A full width shaving along the entire edge of the board indicates that it is flat and true. 

A full width shaving along the entire edge of the board indicates that it is flat and true. 

Prepping the edges of these two boards for glue up

Prepping the edges of these two boards for glue up

Using my Stanley 607 to clean up these two edges prior to glueup.

Using my Stanley 607 to clean up these two edges prior to glueup.

These two boards are being glued together so that the Ash is large enough to accomodate the A-pillar and B-pillar components. 

These two boards are being glued together so that the Ash is large enough to accomodate the A-pillar and B-pillar components.